英語で日本のメンタル事情を説明してみた。


ファンキーアコです。

 

一昨日こちらのブログで、自分が長年悩んできた症状が実は双極性障害Ⅱ型というものであった、ということを公表するに至りました。



同じメンタルの病気、もしくはもっと大変な思いをされている方に大変失礼かも知れませんが、私はそのあと、わざわざ公開しなくてもよかったんじゃないかとかなり悩みました。

 

そんなときにFacebookのお友達のアメリカ人、ジェネールから、日本人のメンタルヘルスに対する意識を尋ねられました。

 

それでせっかくなので英語ライティングの練習を兼ねて、英語でも回答を書いてみたんです。

 

英語はまだまだじっくりと推敲すればもっとよいものが書けるだろうし、ここの中ですべての情報を折り込むわけにはいかないし、後から後からよい表現がポツポツわいてきてキリがないのですが、とりあえず書いたものをシェアしてみます。

 

※日本語訳は下にあります。



 

Hi Janelle, Thank you for being interested in this post and asking me about people's notion about mental health in Japan. Unfortunately, in my opinion, it’s safe to say that we generally have less understanding of mental disorder whatsoever than the westerners probably do. Talking about it openly is not still considered to be very common or preferable (or it could even be a taboo topic..), I guess. It might be becoming better compared to some decades ago, though. Still, however, people might consider you to be “an attention whore” or “a self-pittier” if you openly talk about your mental condition.

 

I’m afraid some people might decide to keep away from me by revealing to them I have bipolar II disorder. They might think I’m a difficult person to deal with. That’s partly because what bipolar is is not well-known, and people might tend to fear or even avoid what they don’t know much about. Or people tend to think that it's none of their business and just keep ignoring it. So, a little later on, I began to feel a bit regret. I knew the fact that I was diagnosed with bipolar doesn’t change anything. I’m still me - the same person as yesterday, 3 years ago, even ten years ago. I thought “Oh, should I have bothered to say it? Should I have made it public?” I didn’t mean to try to get people’s attention or anything like that by doing so. Too bad if I ended up giving them such an impression.(You know, "ordinary" people normally talk only about something that makes them look "superior" and not going out to revealing something that makes them look "inferior," right? So that's why my doing this confused me. No offense, but does it show how "UNordinary" I am after all??) 

 

I learned that more people (one in 20, according to one research study) have bipolar disorder than I expected. It turned out that I was one of them, but to be totally honest with you, it made me feel relieved or even happy than disappointed or shocked because the long-term confusion about my tendency was defined finally by being diagnosed. I even feel I’ve been saved. I’ve always wanted to know what makes my mood swing so much. I’ve always wanted to know what makes me feel so miserable shortly after feeling excited and euphoric for a while. Now I understand what it is all about thanks to my hospital visit (recommended by one of my daughters). However, just as recently as one year ago or so, I never thought I might have this disorder. When my friend asked me if I do, I laughed it off. I knew I had some bad days, but I thought so did everyone. Besides, I knew that people with bipolar disorder tend to do something eccentric and outrageous in the periods of elevated mood, and my mood wasn’t uplifted that much. (Maybe my hidden meaning was "I'm not that crazy!" ...sorry about my harsh language...) This shows how little I actually knew about this mental disorder back then. “Bipolar I disorder” was the one I was talking about then, and I didn’t know that there’s another a little milder one - bipolar II disorder. Then I ended up realizing that’s the one that my friend was talking about then, and the more I looked into the symptoms, the more similarities I began to find with mine. It made perfect sense to me. Then it made me sure that revealing my condition and how long and how this disorder has tormented me could help someone who is having trouble in a similar situation without knowing what to do or what is happening to them. This is how I decided to make my bipolar II disorder available to public. 

 

I understand it’s very difficult to admit that you might be having mental disorders. It’s even more difficult if you think that what you’re having might be something that is socially unacceptable (I’m not saying that bipolar disorder and other mental illnesses are the ones). It’s no wonder that people tend to feel confused about something that they don’t really know. I myself might have some biased ideas about something without noticing just because I’m ignorant about it. That is something that my experience taught me and made me think this time also.

 

Thank you again for your comment and giving me such a great opportunity to think about people’s attitude toward mental ailments in Japan.


※とりあえず日本語訳を付けますが、必ずしも対訳にはなっていません。

 

ジャネール、興味をもってくれてありがとう。残念ながら日本はおそらく欧米に比べるとこの分野の認識は低いと思います。自分のメンタルの話をすると『構ってちゃん』と思われることもあるかも知れません。

 

メンタルの病気に対して人々の理解が低いので、私が双極性障害と診断されたことを公にしたことで、私は扱いにくいタイプの人間だろうと私から距離を置くようになる人も残念ながらいるんじゃないかと思います。診断を受けたからと言って今までの自分が急に変わるわけじゃないし、私も黙っておけばよかった、わざわざ言う公表する必要などなかったかもと一瞬思いました。

 

でも、Ⅱ型では100人に5人の割合で発症するという調査もあるほど多くの人がこの症状を持っているらしいと知りました。自分も高校生の頃からずっと悩んできてやっと正確らしい診断を得て今まで自分に起きていた不可解だったことがいろいろと明らかになって安心したというのは正直な気持ちです。そんな自分でさえ、1年ほど前にある人から私は双極性障害ではないかと言われたときはまさか自分が?と思いました。その時は正しい知識がなくて、双極性はⅠ型のような激しい症状だけだと思ったんです。でもⅡ型であれば自分の症状に当てはまると納得できました。だから自分が双極性障害Ⅱ型と診断されたことを公表することで、私のような密かに悩んでいる人に知ってもらったり、それがきっかけで病院に行ってみたり楽になったりするのであれば嬉しいと思ったのです。

 

 

世の中の理解が低いかもしれないことは、人は自分や自分の家族に経験のないことは理解しにくいし戸惑うものなので当然かも知れないと思います。自分もよく知らないがために偏見を持ってしまっていることは気づかないだけでたくさんあると思います。今回コメントいただいたおかげで、自分のこの経験を通してそんなことを学ぶ機会にもなりました。本当にありがとう。

 


そしてこの返信の投稿のあと、以前歌を教えていただいていた同じく名古屋在住のジャズシンガー、石橋真利子さんからとても嬉しいお言葉をいただきました。

 


 

 

そしてこちらが私の返信です。


石橋先生、コメントありがとうございます。とても励まされました!

 

本当に確かに診断を受けてから気持ち的に楽になったんですが、それは『恐れているものの正体』がわかった時の安心感に似ていますね。治ったわけではないけれど、おっしゃるように対処法があるということも安心の大きな要因だと思います。

 

Siaもそうなんですね。日本では芥川龍之介などもそうだったと聞いて、優秀な人の中に混じった感じがしてちょっと高揚感を感じました(苦笑)。神経が過敏で気苦労が多い分、クリエイティブな仕事にはいい影響が出ることもあるかもしれないと思います。

 

今回のことでLGBTの方の気持ちが少しだけですがわかった気がしました。自分という人間がカテゴリで変わるわけではないのに、属している場所で判断されてしまうとしたら悲しいなと。

 

"self-pittier"に関してはGoogleでいろいろ調べていたらヒットしたんで盗みました(笑)。でも造語的なのか、ワードは間違っていると言って認識してくれませんでした(笑)